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Animated boot screen on openSuSE 10.2

Everyone who has used openSuSE 10.2 must have come across the animated boot screen. But the problem is that its not permanent. It comes sometimes, and doesnt come at other times. Im writing this tutorial for all you penguin lovers who would like to see the animated boot everytime!

1. In the terminal (from your home folder) type mkdir new
2. Type cp /boot/message new
3. Now type cd new
4. Type cpio -i < message
5. Dont close the terminal, and open the folder new in your home folder (from konqueror or nautilus) and edit “gfxboot.cfg” file in kwrite/gedit
6. Change “penguin=-1” to “penguin=100” and save the file
7. Now delete the message file in the new directory by typing rm message
8. Now type ls . | cpio -o > message
9. Now type sudo cp message /boot, enter your root password if required.

That’s it! Reboot and check.. You should have the animated boot permanently enabled!

EDIT: Please backup your original /boot/message file before trying this!

Everyone who has used openSuSE 10.2 must have come across the animated boot screen. But the problem is that its not permanent. It comes sometimes, and doesnt come at other times. Im writing this tutorial for all you penguin lovers who would like to see the animated boot everytime! 1. In the terminal (from your…

6 Comments

  1. Don’t forget to tell people to backup the original /boot/message file before changing anything.

    Thanks for the step-by-step instructions though, I can’t get my head around the cpio command 🙁

    I changed -1 to 0 in gfxboot.cfg as the penguin theme is the only thing I don’t like in openSUSE 10.2.

  2. David, thanks for visiting my blog! I’ve added your suggestion.
    Are you still having some problem with the cpio command?

  3. Thank you for posting this. My own intention was to get rid of the penguins (which I had no clue of how to do) rather than making them permanent… but that is a matter of taste! Anyhow, when you issue

    ls . | cpio -o >message

    (4) above, the file “message” itself gets included, and that is not what you want. This does not cause any immediate trouble, but if you try to repeat the procedure it does. Instead something like

    ls . | cpio -o >/boot/message

    (as root) could be used.

  4. Cool instructions 🙂
    This solution help me to set custom image for boot screen!

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